Thursday, June 30, 2016

Bette Midler’s Family Has the Craziest Pool House: “It’s Like a Mullet”

Elle Decor
HOUSE TOUR: Bette Midler‘s Minimalist, Moroccan-Inspired Pool House In New York
By Nancy Hass JUN 29, 2016

Driven by his love of simple country churches, artist Martin von Haselberg crafts a pool house on his property in Millbrook, New York, that is full of playful surprises.

It is a word so heinous to Martin von Haselberg that his cultured, British art school–inflected voice drops half an octave when he finally spits it out: “Neutral? One thing I hate is neutral.”

Fortunately, there is little danger that such an adjective will ever be used to describe the poolhouse he created from the ground up on his 110-acre estate, on the outskirts of genteel Millbrook, New York, 90 minutes north of Manhattan. The 1,200-square-foot building has more conceptual twists than a Luis Buñuel film, and it is just as gobsmacking. “I never want to be classified or tied to a particular reality,” says von Haselberg, a former performance artist who, in the heyday of punk, was half of an iconic duo called the Kipper Kids, which influenced everyone from the Blue Man Group to Karen Finley.

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The poolhouse in Millbrook, New York, of artist and performer Martin von Haselberg, which he designed with decorative artist Nancy Kintisch. The chaises are by McKinnon and Harris, the pool surround is Arizona sandstone, and the front door is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Galaxy; the pond beyond was installed by water-garden designer Anthony Archer-Wills.

On approach, you assume that the building is a renovated country church, perhaps one that has stood there—chastely whitewashed and silhouetted against the gently rolling landscape—for a century or two. It helps that the pool itself, with its sybaritic associations, is purposefully not visible at first glance. “At one point I thought I would make it a barn, but then I thought, Why not a sacred space?” he says, as though having his guests slip on their bikinis in a tabernacle was the most natural thing in the world. Piety has its limits, though: Up close, you can see that the massive arched front door is not painted in a sober and austere black, but instead a deep purple, a tip-off to the inspired madness within.

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The stairway walls are of treated pine, and the stairs are painted a custom red by Fine Paints of Europe.

Once inside, things get trippy fast. In collaboration with the Los Angeles creative consultant and color specialist Nancy Kintisch, who has worked with Oliver Stone and Candice Bergen, von Haselberg has turned the sanctuary into a minimalist Moroccan-inspired pastel fantasia: a riad by way of Candy Land. “I wanted to build something that looked one way on the outside, but was totally, radically not that on the inside,” he says. His inspiration for such a contrast was a house he saw 35 years ago in Venice, California, designed by the avant-garde architect Brian Murphy. It purposefully appeared to be a run-down shack from the street, but as soon as you stepped inside, it became a modernist paradise. “That image stuck with me, and I knew I would do something like it someday,” he says.

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In the dining area, the Series 7 chairs by Arne Jacobsen are from Fritz Hansen; the floor is painted in Sailor’s Delight, the doors in Nosegay and Lily White, and the ceiling beams in Nosegay, all by Benjamin Moore. 

But even the Murphy house didn’t have this: floors lacquered in baby pink. “I was thinking of painted floors, and I told Nancy, ‘Let’s do something joyful and very feminine.’ When she suggested pink, I was all in,” he says. The floors are only the opening salvo, however. Walls and doorframes in the lofty space are a creamy white and washed seafoam. An island in the open kitchen is topped with pale green cerused white ash; its base is made “to look like stacked sticks of melting butter.” Nearby stands an oval dining table surrounded by Arne Jacobsen chairs in lime and lemon. The beamed ceiling—35 feet at its peak—is what Kintisch calls “cat belly lavender.”

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The kitchen island is topped with custom-painted white ash; the sink is by Julien, and the fittings are by KWC.

In keeping with the barefoot-bohemian vibe, there isn’t much furniture (painted cabinetry hides the appliances), but such spareness lends a magical intimacy to the centerpiece—a huge U-shaped built-in sofa tucked into a wallpapered carrel and bedecked with pillows in Kintisch’s digitally printed fabrics. “I tend to be a little more conservative than Martin is, because some clients just won’t go that far. It’s such a pleasure to work with him, because he pushes me to the edge. He’s never afraid,” says Kintisch, who has collaborated with von Haselberg for more than 35 years, on houses in Los Angeles and Laguna Beach as well as a penthouse apartment in Manhattan.

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Von Haselberg in his poolhouse; the custom cabinetry is painted in Benjamin Moore’s Whitewater Bay. 

The Millbrook spread’s 3,500-square-foot main house—a Craftsman-Gothic- cum-Japanese pagoda with black scalloped shingles and red trim that was designed a decade ago by architect Frederick Fisher and decorated by Fernando Santangelo—carries her signature touches as well; its master suite has walls tufted in pink wool and a lush, dusty blue carpet.

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In the raised sitting area, the patterned wallpaper and cushion fabrics are by Nancy Kintisch and the sconces are by Atelier de Troupe.

The poolhouse contains one final surprise that von Haselberg likes to unfurl at the end of the tour, a bravura finish. Walk out through the enormous sliding-glass doors—a movable wall, really—toward the serene pool, and then glance back at the exterior, he instructs. Instead of a pristine church, this side of the building has been tweaked to resemble a classic, old-timey beach cottage, the white wood siding accented with thin, bright green stripes and a slate terrace dotted with tables shielded from the sun by canvas umbrellas. A perfect spot for when von Haselberg’s daughter, 29, hauls a pack of friends up from the city for the weekend.

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A changing area is sheathed in treated pine.

“It’s all part of the idea that things are not what they seem. Just when you think you’ve figured it out, it surprises you, this house,” says von Haselberg. “It’s like a mullet. All business in the front, party in the back.”

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Wednesday, June 29, 2016

BetteBack Review September 20, 1996: SECOND THOUGHTS ABOUT `FIRST WIVES CLUB’

Los Angeles Daily News
September 20, 1996 | Amy Dawes Daily News Film Critic

Film ´Der Club der Teufelinnen´ (The first wives club), USA 1996, Regie Hugh Wilson, Szene mit Diane Keaton, Goldie Hawn & Bette Midler, kostüm, perlenkette, brille, nickelbrille halbfigur, freundinnen,

Film ´Der Club der Teufelinnen´ (The first wives club), USA 1996, Regie Hugh Wilson, Szene mit Diane Keaton, Goldie Hawn & Bette Midler, kostüm, perlenkette, brille, nickelbrille halbfigur, freundinnen,

There’s a chance that “The First Wives Club” – a glossy revenge fantasy for women of a certain age – will hit a nerve the way “Waiting to Exhale” did and become a decent-size hit among the fed- up females who identify with it.

There’s a chance, too, that the boomer audience it’s aimed at will decide that aging is too sensitive a topic for laughs.

Either way, stars Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn and Diane Keaton have their work cut out for them when it comes to mining broad comedy from so prickly a subject, and too often, it feels as though the the joke’s on them. Based on the best-selling novel by Olivia Goldsmith, the movie gives us three well-heeled New York women who were pals in college and have since gone their separate ways. Two of them married well and took much of their identity from their husbands’ success, to which they contributed; another (Hawn) became a movie star and used her advantages to help boost the career of her studio executive spouse. What they have in common is that each has recently been dumped for a younger model, invariably portrayed as an airheaded gold-digger (one is played by “Showgirls’ ” Elizabeth Berkley, no less). Brought together by the suicide of an old schoolmate (Stockard Channing), the women basically decide to put aside their differences, get mad and get even. They establish a clubhouse (!) for meetings, and the movie plays out as a broad, lively fantasy, in which they carry out various daring high jinks and maneuvers designed to help each of them take their smug ex-husbands to the cleaners. Screenwriter Robert Harling has pared Goldsmith’s novel down to its breezy essentials, and he supplies a lot of the same kind of bitchy zingers that made his femme comedy “Steel Magnolias” delightful. Midler is ideally suited for slinging the one-liners, and all three of the women give exuberant, energetic performances, though one wishes that Keaton, playing the same harmless, lovable ditz she’s sustained from “Annie Hall” to “Father of the Bride, Part II,” would sort of … grow up. Still, so much of the humor in “First Wives Clubs” comes at the women’s own expense – the first act is a virtual symphony of age-related humiliations and petty female competitiveness – that one can’t help squirming. Aren’t they playing into the same kind of musty, gender-based attitudes that oppress them? The movie’s attempts at female empowerment seem out of touch, and it doesn’t help when the soundtrack blares Aretha Franklin and Annie Lennox’s dated-sounding 1980s anthem “Sisters Are Doin’ It for Themselves.” In this movie, it too often feels as if sisters are doing it to themselves. The facts The film: “The First Wives Club” (PG; adult references). The stars: Bette Midler, Goldie Hawn, Diane Keaton, Bronson Pinchot, Dan Hedaya, Steven Collins, Victor Garber, Marcia Gay Harden. Behind the scenes: Directed by Hugh Wilson. Written by Robert Harling, based on the novel by Olivia Goldsmith. Produced by Scott Rudin. Released by Paramount Pictures. Running time: One hour, 43 minutes. Playing: Citywide. Our rating: Three stars

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Bette Midler On Marruage And Divorce: “You know what I think, too many people have unrealistic expectations about life and marriage is a tough road…

Bette Midler On Marruage And Divorce: “You know what I think, too many people have unrealistic expectations about life and marriage is a tough road. If you think anything else then it’s a big mistake. I think the tough thing about divorce is the effect on the kids. It can be devastating. A lot never recover from it. I would never do that to a child,. I don’t see how people can.” (Daily Record, Sept.25, 1996)

Bette Midler: Bootleg Betty's photo.
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2013 – Bette Midler Celebrates 20 Years of ‘Hocus Pocus’

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Bette Midler On Doing Another Tour Post Experience The Divine: “I may or may not go on tour. I’d like to put something together that’s a little bit smaller so I can get to Europe.

Bette Midler On Doing Another Tour Post Experience The Divine: “I may or may not go on tour. I’d like to put something together that’s a little bit smaller so I can get to Europe. I haven’t been to Europe since 1979. It’s prohibitive to go there. The last time I worked I had 60 people and I can’t travel with 60 people. I wouldn’t make any money. I wouldn’t even break even. So, if I could get something a little smaller, I would love to go because I really do love to go to Europe. I love the people, I love everything, the food, the landscape.” (Daily Record, Sept.25, 1996)

Bette Midler: Bootleg Betty's photo.
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Color of Roses – Bette Midler – Bette TV Series – 2000

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This is a scrapbook site devoted to Bette Midler. Absolutely no profits are being made from the posting of this work. It is presented here for educational and historical reasons only. If, however, you are the owner of this work and would like it removed from this website, please contact me and I will comply as soon as I get the message. Thank you for your time and patience. No disrespect intended. Just a huge admirer and collector of all things Bette Midler. You can contact me at: misterd@bootlegbetty.com

 

BetteBack March 3, 1973: Bawdy, Bodacious Bette

The National Observer
Bawdy, Bodacious Bette
March 3, 1973
By Bill Marvel

7-1-2012 6-35-05 PM

HERE IT IS 7:30 p.m., a whole hour before the Bette Midler concert, and already the lobby in Uihlein Hall is filled up. The 2,300-plus seats were sold out two weeks ago, even though news about the concert was spread mainly by word of mouth and a few spots on top-40 radio. Somebody’s grandmother is standing at the head of the line, chattering across at least two generation gaps to a girl in scruffy blue jeans: “Oh, I’ve watched her on the Johnny Carson show. I didn’t even tell my friends who I’m coming to see.” With derision: “They’ve never heard of her.”

“Look,” says the girl, examining her arms. “I’ve actually got goose bumps. I love this girl. I’m gonna adopt her.”

Goose bumps? Who is Bette Midler, this phenomenon in silver-lame toreador slacks, slithering to old Milwaukee to be born? Other writers have fumbled around in the great, gawdy grab bag that is Miss Midler’s public personality. At one time or another she has been compared to: Janis Joplin, Patti Andrews, Aretha Franklin, Mae West, Laura Nyro, Shirley Temple, Tiny Tim, Grace Slick, Dorothy Lamour, Rita Hayworth, Streisand (of course), Betty Boop, Edith Piaf, Lotte Lenya, Sophie Tucker, Judy Garland ( natch ), and Carmen Miranda.

Voice of the ’70s

But all such comparisons are a pain. Bette Midler is probably the brightest, hottest superstar to rise above the pop-music horizon in the ’70s. Even before her first album, The Divine Miss M, was released by Atlantic records last November, industry seismographs detected a hit. Now more than 100,000 copies have been sold, which is very good for a start.

Last New Year’s Eve the Divine Miss M filled Philharmonic Hall in New York’s Lincoln Center – not just once, but twice. At midnight, with horns, tooting and fireworks crackling out in the streets; she ascended from beneath the stage, diaper-clad, proclaiming 1973 with a banner wrapped around her ample décolletage.

“It’s the boobs,” says the girl in the blue jeans, who turns out to be an art student named Colleen. “I mean, how many girls with boobs like that would go around without a bra?”

Miss M lives up to her advance billing. She comes onstage with her scarlet blouse knotted precariously at the front and a plastic gardenia tucked into her hair. “I’m the last of the truly tacky women,” she announces. “We are embarking on a tour of the tackiest cities of America. And we are starting in your very own town.” Stormy applause and laughter.

A few years ago she was the darling of New York’s Continental Baths. “The Tubs,” as Miss M refers to them, is one of the few really elegant dives left, an oasis of tiled and palmed decadence that looks as though it has been snatched, gay clientele and all, right out of the Satyricon (of Fellini, not of Gaius Petronius ).

The Tonight Show audience tittered – as talk show audiences will do – when Miss M mentioned her apprenticeship at the Baths. But she remains fiercely loyal to “the boys” who used to fill the place up, packed cheek by jowl, to cheer her on. Then, as word spread, a straighter (and richer) clientele began drifting in on week ends to catch this raffish figure with the frizzled orange hair and the outlandish costumes and the repertoire of songs left over from the days of Your Hit Parade and Dick Clark’s American Bandstand.

“It got picked up by all the chic people as the place to go,” she says, with regret. Soon Bette Midler split, taking with her pianist-arranger Barry Manilow and her backup vocal trio, the Harlettes.

Ah, yes. The Harlettes. They wiggle onstage in low-cut slinky black dresses and red platform shoes as she introduces them. “Three cocktail waitresses, right off the street.”

Does Miss M miss her audience at The Tubs? “No, they follow me around,” she says. A Bette Midler audience in full panoply is something to see: street dudes, floor-length furs, enormous dangling earrings, turbans, really high platform shoes. But nothing can match, can even come close to, Miss M herself. Arms flapping like disengaged crank handles, she undulates across the stage, twists, squats, thrusts out a hip here, a shoulder there, never at rest. A Midler performance is, above all, hard work.

`Aloha’ to Hawaii

“The way I was brought up, I was taught to work,” she says. Her father, a house painter from Paterson, N.J., took the family to Hawaii in hopes of finding paradise. Instead they found a Eurasian neighborhood where Jews were not particularly welcome. Miss M’s first brush with show business came when her mother, a movie buff, named her after Bette Davis. Only Mrs. Midler pronounced it “Bet.” And so it remains. That must have been 28-30 years ago; the Divine Miss M’s age is practically a state secret.

Bette escaped Hawaii by joining the cast of the movie Hawaii and getting shipped to Los Angeles for filming at the studio. She saved practically everything she earned on the picture and within two months had moved to New York. There, for the next five years, she paid her dues, as they say in show biz. She played small clubs in the Village, in off-off-Broadway, in the chorus of Fiddler on the Roof, and finally up front as Tevye’s eldest daughter, Tzeitl. But it took The Tubs to bring out the trash that was in her. Trash, as in junk.

For Bette Midler is a strutting, vamping, singing collection of the rags and bones of four decades of American popular music. “We are going to sing all the garbage we know,” she tells her audience. And she means it. She belts out the torch songs from the Thirties, Andrews Sisters swing from the Forties, teeny-bopper laments from the Fifties, and “low-rent retro rock ‘n’ roll” from the Sixties, her performance always at the nexus of high style and high art.

The Mask of an Artist

In the same deadpan spirit in which Andy Warhol transformed the Campbell’s Soup can, she turns a vapid ditty such as “Chapel of Love” into a gorgeous little campy put-on. “Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy,” an old Andrews Sisters stalwart, takes on the precision of an abstract painting. “Those girls were so together they could raise their eyebrows in unison,” she says.

With the accuracy of a great actress, she zeroes in on the pathos of a lament such as Ethel Waters’ “Am I Blue?” or John Prine’s moving ballad about old folks, “Hello In There.” In a voice that sounds as if its back were cracked by age, she establishes that special loneliness that sometimes moves in on a wife when her children have grown up and she and her husband have grown apart:

Me and my husband, we don’t talk anymore
He sits and stares out the back door screen. . . .

It is Miss Midler’s way with ballads such as these – and the haunting “Delta Dawn,” in which she sings one breathless chorus of a cappella – that has won over many a critic too stodgy to see what she is about in the more campy numbers. The amount of personal pain she is able to project is astonishing, and names like Helen Morgan, Ethel Waters, and Bessie Smith come to mind.

“I’ve listened to all their records,” Miss M says. “They led fabulous lives and it came out in their voices and songs. Everybody leaves me with something.”

But something is added, too, and one wonders how much of that pain is a personal burden.

She’s `Up for Grabs’

Miss Midler is as guarded about her life offstage as one would expect, and as she has a right to be. The nearest thing to a personal tragedy is hinted at in the dedication on her album: “This is for Judith.” Judith, her oldest sister, is dead. “She was a photographer,” Miss Midler says. Five other siblings and her parents are still living.

Are the Midler’s a close family? “Uh huh, fairly close. But we’re all strange. You know, individualists.” Her mother, the movie buff, is delighted by Bette’s stardom. Saves clippings and everything. “My father thinks it’s all kind of silly.”

None of the family has seen The Divine Miss M in concert, “and they’re not gonna,” she says. “It would just kill my father.”

Romance? The last reported affair was with Mike Federal, her bass player. But he moved on, and apparently that’s over. “You can tell the world that the Divine Miss M is up for grabs,” she announces, throwing her arms out in a gesture that by its extravagance suggests that she is not all that up for grabs.

The Prime Movers

Above all, Bette Midler wants to be taken as a serious artist. The fooling around, the raunchiness is the mask through which she speaks; her work is just another instance of Twentieth Century art recycling itself, finding new subjects among the artifacts of the past, sometimes among the tackiest – what Bette Midler calls “the pits” – and polishing them up, making them new again.

“I’ve always loved popular music. Popular things are the prime movers,” she says.

“The Seventies is a time for re-evaluation. Everybody is coming out of the fabulous Sixties and they’re just exhausted. Most people are sad and they don’t know why.”

Miss M’s antidote is herself in generous doses. “I tend to go for funky music. I haven’t done Jo Stafford yet, but I will someday. I love Patti Page and her `Old Cape Cod,’ but I only do it when I’m in the Cape Cod area.” She sings a few bars, accurately catching the buttery lilt of Patti Page’s voice.

“I love Teresa Brewer. Actually, ‘Wheel of Fortune’ was instrumental in setting me in my path. I attended The Ridiculous Theatrical Company once in the late 1960s and there was this girl in the cast. They had all these fanciful names and hers was Blackeyed Susan. She was kind of a running-gag character. In one part she was a hooker on the docks, and she came out and recited this endless Robert Service poem that made no sense at all. Then in this 1930s number she came out wrapped in toilet paper with dollar bills taped to her. She was the Statue of Liberty and she sang ‘Wheel of Fortune’.”

Her Control Is Absolute

“I didn’t think I could stand up and sing. But after that. . . .”

From the sentimental to the ridiculous and back again. Miss Midler’s voice projects every shade of meaning in a song, and her face can be read right up to the top balcony. But her greatest instrument is an audience: Her control is absolute, and she can lay a change of mood on 2,300 as if she had wires to their brains. It’s a long way from The Tubs.

Does she sometimes wonder about the apparatus she has set in motion? The manager, the press agent, the thousands of fans who want to hear their favorites over and over, who resist every change in their idol?

“I try not to think of it,” she says. “It’s all very frightening.”

The interview is taking place in Chicago, following the Milwaukee concert. Outside, the shoreline of Lake Michigan is ice-packed. Without her outrageous costume, the plastic gardenia, her makeup, Bette Midler seems closer to her five feet, one inch than on the stage.

Earlier in the day she spent an hour autographing albums at Montgomery Ward, State and Adams streets. The mob was huge and she was gracious. As her manager, store officials, and other supernumeraries hustled her through the crush, people were saying, “She’s so short.”

Forget it. Bette Midler is 10 feet tall. And still growing.

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Hello Dolly; A Classic Returns, Singing All The Way

Paul’s Valley Democrat
A classic returns, singing all the way
Mike Arie Jun 26, 2016

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I had the great pleasure to enjoy a number of Dolly Levi encounters. Mrs. Levi is the name of the leading character in the Tony Award winning musical “Hello, Dolly!” with music and lyrics by Jerry Herman, a book by Michael Stewart and based on “The Matchmaker,” a play by Thornton Wilder.

David Merrick was the legendary producer of the original 1964 production and over the years, it was a Broadway and touring showcase for a number of great ladies of theatre and film, from Ethel Merman and Mary Martin to Ginger Rogers.

Enter, stage left, Carol Channing, who would win a Tony Award as the original Dolly and for nearly four decades, tour the nation playing the role in thousands of performances. I was able to savor stops and up close and personal encounters along Dolly’s journey into theatre history. Enjoy!

The first: Mr. Merrick was a man well ahead of his time. He assembled the first all African-American cast with Pearl Bailey as Dolly and legendary crooner, Cab Calloway as Horace Vandergelder, Dolly’s love interest.

The Broadway matinee I saw turned out to be on Ms. Bailey’s birthday and after the final curtain, she and the cast staged a party on stage where Ms. Bailey performed a comedy routine for the ages.

The second: I saw one of Ms. Channing’s performances in LA, (she loved to tour and was legendary for never missing a performance), and an extra bonus was that a former summer theatre colleague of mine was in the cast in a leading character role. Michael would tour with Ms. Channing off and on for years.

The third: After the aforementioned LA production, Michael invited us backstage to meeting Miss Channing in her dressing room.

She is also well-known for never forgetting who she meets. Regrettably, I may never have an opportunity to test that out. Most memorable of all was that she was lovely and gracious after an already long evening.

Finally: A few years later, we enjoyed seeing Miss Channing and lifelong friend George Burns at Chasen’s, the famous Beverly Hills restaurant. It was one of former President Ronald Reagan’s favorite places and was a prominent fixture during his ‘Western’ White House years.

The spring 2017 Broadway edition of “Hello, Dolly!” will star Bette Midler and David Hyde Pierce, established stars in their own right. Ms. Midler from music and film and Mr. Pierce from television and theatre. As the production evolves, what will be interesting to follow are these two points:

• What to do with a weak book: As I have commented on before, for today’s audiences, I am not certain that the story will hold their attention. The reason producer’s bring in major stars is to balance out today’s expectations and yesterdays winning formula.

• Will they revive the famous Gower Champion choreography? Mr. Champion’s memorable work was more than just the Harmonia Gardens scene with the dancing waiters and an historic song.

Coming soon: The SpongeBob Musical. Based on the popular cartoon, it begins its run up to Broadway in Chicago. The nation’s Bicentennial takes stage once again, 40 years removed. Some personal, and ‘dramatic’ reflections.

“It’s so nice to have you back, where you belong,” in our town.

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This is a scrapbook site devoted to Bette Midler. Absolutely no profits are being made from the posting of this work. It is presented here for educational and historical reasons only. If, however, you are the owner of this work and would like it removed from this website, please contact me and I will comply as soon as I get the message. Thank you for your time and patience. No disrespect intended. Just a huge admirer and collector of all things Bette Midler. You can contact me at: misterd@bootlegbetty.com

 

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Bette Midler On Her Marriage To Martin von Haselberg: “My marriage is going along like a marriage. It’s a marriage. We’re not a revengeful couple. We’re actually rather civil to each other, we’re very decent…

Bette Midler On Her Marriage To Martin von Haselberg: “My marriage is going along like a marriage. It’s a marriage. We’re not a revengeful couple. We’re actually rather civil to each other, we’re very decent. The star added: “It’s hard, it’s a lot of give and take. But he’s never done anything to me that would make me want to murder him. I’m not so sure he hasn’t wanted to murder me once or twice, but I’m still standing, so I think everything must be okay.” (Daily Record, Sept.25, 1996)

Bette Midler: Bootleg Betty's photo.
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"Find your Light; They can't love you if they can't see you" ~ Bette Midler

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* Access the monthly Bette Midler Jukebox: Click Here

This is a scrapbook site devoted to Bette Midler. Absolutely no profits are being made from the posting of this work. It is presented here for educational and historical reasons only. If, however, you are the owner of this work and would like it removed from this website, please contact me and I will comply as soon as I get the message. Thank you for your time and patience. No disrespect intended. Just a huge admirer and collector of all things Bette Midler. You can contact me at: misterd@bootlegbetty.com

 

Bette Midler – The Cast of Hocus Pocus on the Today Show (1993)

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Shop At The Official Bette Midler Store: Click Here

"Find your Light; They can't love you if they can't see you" ~ Bette Midler

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* Access the monthly Bette Midler Jukebox: Click Here

This is a scrapbook site devoted to Bette Midler. Absolutely no profits are being made from the posting of this work. It is presented here for educational and historical reasons only. If, however, you are the owner of this work and would like it removed from this website, please contact me and I will comply as soon as I get the message. Thank you for your time and patience. No disrespect intended. Just a huge admirer and collector of all things Bette Midler. You can contact me at: misterd@bootlegbetty.com